Wells Fargo Loan Modification - Independent Evaluation Available

Jamey Mendez

LoanSafe Member
Apr 26, 2017
5
2
3
40
I don't know if this forum is still live, but I need some advice. WF denied us anything a loan modification stating that they could not find an available program for us. We are 3 months behind in mortgage totaling $ 5798.67 and soon to be 4 months with June almost upon us. Where do I go from here? File an appeal? Speak to a real estate lawyer? Any advice is MUCH APPRECIATED!!! I'm located in Nj
 

dolores gallegos

LoanSafe Member
Jun 7, 2017
2
0
1
49
Are you having an "issue" with Wells Fargo? Given inaccurate information? Delayed in the loan process? denied when you think you should be approved?

Email or call in and let's get started with an independent evaluation of what we can do in verifying your unique situation and working with your state and the CFPB to get some more remedies.

I just saw this article online at a reliable web source "e credit daily" and i am happy to see people speaking up.:

"Wells Fargo Chairman and Chief Executive John G. Stumpf got a bigger dose of mortgage complaints than he was likely expecting at the lender’s annual meeting in San Antonio, which was meant to be mainly a forum for touting the bank’s achievements in 2013.

The CEO’s mostly upbeat comments to shareholders were quickly overshadowed by one question after another from homeowners about the bank’s loan-modification and mortgage-servicing practices, reports The Wall Street Journal.

Shareholders or their representatives spent much of a question-and-answer session pushing Stumpf to reduce the principal amounts on loans or make the loan-modification process easier for struggling borrowers.

“The San Antonio meeting was rife with complaints about lost documents and the length of the loan-modification process, which some who spoke said could take over a year,” WSJ reported.​

READ MORE: http://ecreditdaily.com/2014/04/wells-fargo-shareholder-meeting-swamped-mortgage-modification-complaints/
 

Michael Naz

Michael Naz
Jan 9, 2011
2,965
38
48
Southern California
I wanted to post this as I know from long time users on loansafe that had a modification or attempted modification how hard it seemed.

We still have about 20,000 loan mods being offered and completed monthly nationwide, but troubles in servicing mortgages have always been a part of the industry and life.

I am available now for reviewing or assisting in loan mod efforts or remediation with the supervision or possible legal assistance from an attorney of your choosing.

Alternatively, you can work with one attorney I can recommend wholeheartedly, because he is the second attorney I worked under when the FDIC loan mod in a box protocol was released in 2008 headed by FDIC chairman AND one of my personal heros, Sheila Bair.

I have kept over 2200 modification records from Wells Fargo and other servicers indicating the problem Wells Fargo was just recently forced to disclose through a regulatory filing under new leadership, is not limited to just the 625 homeowners who were impacted from a “calculation error involving a mortgage underwriting tool.”

I am considered an expert in loan modification related underwriting and processing.

I was hired in a state bar case for a firm with 5300 clients of whom 92% were successfully modified but 100 clients complained about the attorney and his firm and the state bar went after low hanging fruit, the attorneys not working for the banks, but working for homeowners.

The state bar should have gone after the attorneys who executed wrongful foreclosures on behalf of Wells Fargo and others servicers while knowing they were foreclosing on forged Robo-signed mortgage documents.

Many homeowners were disqualified erroneously by Wells Fargo not just for underwriting, but for also cutting appraisals or inflating them in mod underwriting.

The reason was that it made them more money servicing a delinquent loan than a loan that is performing.

Dragging on the loan mod process or short sale or deed in lieu of foreclosure process only lined the pockets of the mortgage servicers at the expense of the true investors in the loan because the servicers always got paid first no matter the outcome.

Sometimes the owner of the loan was also the Servicer of the loan and yes Wells Fargo surely hurt themselves in some cases by erroneously foreclosing on a home.

But I would bet it was done at a far lower rate than loans not owned by Wells Fargo but owned by other competing banks like BofA or Citi or Chase for example.

I would say the problem is at least 25,000 to 150,000 cases where Wells Fargo homeowners were erroneously foreclosed upon because of this underwriting tool or ones similar too it and it happened from 2007 to 2018 possibly.

The second supervising attorney that I worked with in 2009 was David Leon Speckman who is also a real estate broker and a CPA.

He is willing to supervise my work for any loansafe member who had a problem with a loan mod or needs one today because they can’t refinace but do qualify for a modification.

He is willing to sue any mortgage Servicer if I can show him the homeowner was qualified for a mod but was denied erroneously or has a real estate related problem.

Most records are available from Wells Fargo through a qualified written request under RESPA though it’s important to have contemporaneous documentation from the borrower/homeowner.

I have had several bad experiences personally with Wells Fargo with multiple bank accounts being opened and closed without my approval or permission.

I have seen over 500 cases of Wells Fargo customers be denied a loan mod when they should have been approved.

One of my clients was Doug Seiler a 30 year mortgage broker and they tried to foreclose on him but I saved his house.

You can call him for a reference.

Please reach out to me or Moe 800-779-4547 or Erik 619-379-8999 or anyone else at loansafe if you feel you have been wrongfully denied a loan mod or approved for one you could never possibly afford to pay back.

From the Charlotte Observer, August 3rd 2018:

‘We’re very sorry.’

Wells Fargo admits error that cost hundreds of people their homes.

August 03, 2018 05:53pm

Wells Fargo acknowledged Friday that hundreds of its customers lost their homes over a roughly five-year period because of an error by the bank.

In yet another apology for the San Francisco-based bank, Wells said a calculation error involving a mortgage underwriting tool resulted in 625 customers being incorrectly denied or not offered modifications to make their loans more affordable. In about 400 of those cases, the homes were ultimately foreclosed on.

The bank, which has a large presence in Charlotte, said the error affected customers in the foreclosure process between April 2010 and October 2015, when the problem was corrected.

The error was uncovered in an internal review, Wells said. The bank also said it has set aside $8 million for customers who were caught up in the problem.

“We’re very sorry that this error occurred and are providing remediation to the approximately 625 customers who may have been impacted,” spokesman Tom Goyda said in a statement. He said the bank did not have a breakdown of where the customers were from.

Wells also disclosed Friday that federal agencies are probing how the bank purchased certain federal low-income housing tax credits in connection with the financing of low-income housing developments. The bank did not provide additional details about those investigations.

The latest disclosures add to the stream of revelations about practices that have harmed customers at the fourth-largest U.S. bank, whose reputation has been tarnished by a massive sales scandal that erupted in 2016 as well as newer problems.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Justice Department fined Wells more than $2 billion for mortgages it made and sold to investors in the run-up to the financial crisis. Wells agreed to that deal to settle allegations it knowingly misrepresented the quality of the residential loans, which cost investors billions of dollars when they soured.

In April, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency fined Wells $1 billion over claims of improper mortgage and auto-lending practices that harmed consumers.

According to Friday’s disclosure, made in a securities filing, Wells said it had substantially completed the internal review of the mortgage modification issue.


Wells also noted that it continues to review other parts of its business that it previously disclosed may have harmed customers. Those include foreign exchange, wealth management, auto lending and add-on products like identity theft protection.

Wells has about 25,100 workers in the Charlotte metro area, its largest employment hub.

Did this happen to you?

If you or anyone you know lost a home because of Wells Fargo’s error, reporter Deon Roberts would like to hear from you. Contact him at [email protected] or (704) 358-5248.
 

Michael Naz

Michael Naz
Jan 9, 2011
2,965
38
48
Southern California
And this from today I just saw on the Charlotte observer. Not shocking at all and this erroneous foreclosure or denial or approval of a loan mod is not just isolated to Wells Fargo servicing.

Please reach out to me or Erik or Moe if you need help with a loan related issue because you can’t refinance and need help or think you had an erroneous loan denial or approval of a loan mod or refinance you can’t afford.

The Charlotte Observer

Fresh outrage for Wells Fargo after mortgage error. ‘Apologies don’t fix the problem.’

By Deon Roberts [email protected]

August 06, 2018 06:29 PM

Wells Fargo admitted last week that its error contributed to hundreds of people losing their homes to foreclosure. There may be more victims.
Wells Fargo is facing fresh outrage over its latest revelation of harm to customers, after the bank admitted last week that its error contributed to hundreds of people losing their homes to foreclosure.

In the disclosure, made in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday, Wells said its error caused more than 600 people in foreclosure to be incorrectly denied, or not offered, modifications to make home loans more affordable. Of that group, about 400 ultimately lost their homes, according to the bank, which apologized for the mistake.

There may be more victims. In its filing, Wells did not rule out uncovering additional problems, noting, “This effort to identify other instances in which customers may have experienced harm is ongoing, and it is possible that we may identify other areas of potential concern.”

The admission comes almost two years after a September 2016 sales scandal over unauthorized customer accounts, which stained the reputation of the San Francisco-based bank. The latest disclosure adds to the list of problematic practices Wells Fargo has admitted to since the sales scandal that have drawn the scrutiny of federal regulators.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat who has been an outspoken critic of Wells, in a tweet Monday reiterated her calls for CEO Tim Sloan to be fired. Sloan took over in 2016 after former CEO John Stumpf resigned following the sales scandal.

“Because of an error @wellsfargo made, 400 of its customers lost their homes,” Warren tweeted. “What’s the bank doing to make it right? Setting aside a few thousand dollars for each of the people affected. Pathetic. The execs who oversaw this – including CEO Tim Sloan – should be fired.”
 

CAbooboo

LoanSafe Member
Jan 22, 2017
66
9
8
And this from today I just saw on the Charlotte observer. Not shocking at all and this erroneous foreclosure or denial or approval of a loan mod is not just isolated to Wells Fargo servicing.

Please reach out to me or Erik or Moe if you need help with a loan related issue because you can’t refinance and need help or think you had an erroneous loan denial or approval of a loan mod or refinance you can’t afford.

The Charlotte Observer

Fresh outrage for Wells Fargo after mortgage error. ‘Apologies don’t fix the problem.’

By Deon Roberts [email protected]

August 06, 2018 06:29 PM

Wells Fargo admitted last week that its error contributed to hundreds of people losing their homes to foreclosure. There may be more victims.
Wells Fargo is facing fresh outrage over its latest revelation of harm to customers, after the bank admitted last week that its error contributed to hundreds of people losing their homes to foreclosure.

In the disclosure, made in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday, Wells said its error caused more than 600 people in foreclosure to be incorrectly denied, or not offered, modifications to make home loans more affordable. Of that group, about 400 ultimately lost their homes, according to the bank, which apologized for the mistake.

There may be more victims. In its filing, Wells did not rule out uncovering additional problems, noting, “This effort to identify other instances in which customers may have experienced harm is ongoing, and it is possible that we may identify other areas of potential concern.”

The admission comes almost two years after a September 2016 sales scandal over unauthorized customer accounts, which stained the reputation of the San Francisco-based bank. The latest disclosure adds to the list of problematic practices Wells Fargo has admitted to since the sales scandal that have drawn the scrutiny of federal regulators.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat who has been an outspoken critic of Wells, in a tweet Monday reiterated her calls for CEO Tim Sloan to be fired. Sloan took over in 2016 after former CEO John Stumpf resigned following the sales scandal.

“Because of an error @wellsfargo made, 400 of its customers lost their homes,” Warren tweeted. “What’s the bank doing to make it right? Setting aside a few thousand dollars for each of the people affected. Pathetic. The execs who oversaw this – including CEO Tim Sloan – should be fired.”
Dear Mr Naz

Thought I’d take your suggestion and reach out about my Wells Fargo debacle.

I reside in Northern CA - next door to the home I built, struggled with and ultimately lost to foreclosure in April 2017. In January 2017, I found Loansafe - specifically, the Bagels thread started by Isisis. I was so inspired and ready to fight. However, I was devastated by the unexpected death of my canine child, then my sister/neighbor was diagnosed with and died of brain cancer and finally, within that year’s time, my home was gone.

Now, post-foreclosure I’m unable to move on until I know the true disposition of my loan(s). Coupled with the recent admission by Wells concerning modifications, I’m compelled to put this to rest, one way or another.

Most of my loan details are outlined in the Bagels Forum. I’m at a loss as to who to talk to, what, if anything to do - or can I do. As mentioned, it’s difficult to be at peace - especially knowing Wells Fargo was paid over $60K on my second LOE vs the IRS (and State) for personal income tax liens. Wells conveniently sold the first loan to a 2013 Trust prior to auction in order to collect excess proceeds from the sale.

Suffice it to say, I’m angry, confused, worn out, but willing to fight if needed. Thank you very much for your time. Any thoughts and suggestions are greatly appreciated!

P.S. My apologies for interjecting life events as I know it’s best to stay focused on facts. Also realize many Loansafe members have endured the same and more while fighting for some sort of justice. I truly admire them.
 

Michael Naz

Michael Naz
Jan 9, 2011
2,965
38
48
Southern California
Cabooboo, you’re not alone and really sorry to hear about your situation.

Here is a key quote from an article:

““Historically, miscalculations in [loan] reviews are not uncommon. They normally show up in income calculations and appraisal figures,” Alys Cohen, an attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, told me. “What’s different here—but probably not unique—was that it was an input to the software that was uniform for everybody. And the question really is: How many more of those existed both at Wells Fargo and at other companies, and what work has anyone done to identify those problems and redress the losses to homeowners?”

The National Consumer Law Center would be a good place to start reach out to Alys Cohen or someone else there to see what could be done.

Alternatively, contact a local attorney through the state bar referral agency.

Or of course you can contact the office of david L. speckman (an attorney I can work with if necessary with and recommend) in San Diego and ask for an appointment and phone consultation and let him know I asked you to contact him.

I can request to review your file from wells and what you have. If you need to reach me please find me on LinkedIn and reach out that way.

Here is the remainder of the article I just quoted:

“How a Wells Fargo Counting Error Cost Hundreds Their Homes

Calculating homeowners’ eligibility for mortgage modifications should have been straightforward. But an automated decision-making tool contained an error for five years.

Alexis C. Madrigal is a staff writer at The Atlantic.
Aug 21, 2018

In a short section of its most recent quarterly report, Wells Fargo revealed that for more than five years, beginning in April 2010, the company had made “an automated miscalculation” that had dropped 625 mortgage holders below a threshold where they could receive a loan modification. Four hundred of these people subsequently had their homes foreclosed on. Wells Fargo finally caught the error in October 2015.

Coverage of the problem described it as “an error,” or even “a computer glitch.” The description in the Securities and Exchange Commission filing, meanwhile, raises as many questions as it answers: “This error in the modification tool caused an automated miscalculation of attorneys’ fees that were included for purposes of determining whether a customer qualified for a mortgage loan modification.”

As a result, Senators Elizabeth Warren and Brian Schatz sent Wells Fargo executives a long list of questions demanding to know the details of the case. In sum, their queries add up to an exasperated How could this have happened?

We know this much: Wells Fargo created this software itself, according to Tom Goyda, a spokesperson for the company. “It was a tool that we developed,” he told me, “so the programming error was made internally.”

In most loan modifications, the debtor is not actually getting out of paying back any of the principal. Instead, the bank rolls the past-due principal and interest into a larger loan. The bank (or “servicer,” in industry terms) can also roll a bunch of other things like insurance premiums and fees into the new loan balance. Then, sometimes with government money as an incentive, the bank agrees to lower the interest rate and extend the term of the loan to generate a smaller monthly payment. The target amount for that payment, under the main federal program, is 31 percent of the borrower’s gross income. The new loan also has to pass another test for calculating whether the bank is likely to make roughly the same amount of money on the new loan as the old. If it does, and the debt-to-income ratio is right, perhaps the borrower can get a loan modification. If not, then it’s a no-go.

These calculations were made in tremendous numbers during the foreclosure crisis (which was precipitated, in part, by the bad loans that banks targeted to largely black and brown neighborhoods, and for which Wells Fargo was fined $175 million.) Under the most important government-backed loan-modification scheme, HAMP, or the Home Affordable Modification Program, Wells Fargo alone received 1.6 million applications from desperate people.

For these borrowers, the “automated-decisioning tool” that Wells Fargo built took all of the variables from individual loans and borrowers, and combined them with various constants—including, crucially, that incorrect calculation for attorneys’ fees—and came back with a thumbs-up, thumbs-down determination of modification eligibility. But because of that miscalculation, the automated tool gave a thumbs-down to people who were right on the borderline of getting a modification and who should have gotten a thumbs-up.

Only the decision—not its actual calculations—was rolled forward to other parts of the bank, Goyda said, so no one saw the erroneous attorney-fee number. That’s also why, as Wells Fargo disclosed, customers were not actually overcharged; the standalone tool made the decision, but the actual loan terms were dealt with by other means.

Wells Fargo approved 28 percent of modification requests, a little below the average for the four biggest servicers. The number of people affected by the attorney-fee error added up to 0.0386 percent of that HAMP pool.

Set against the massive scale of the Great Recession—9 million jobs lost, 9 million homes lost—this is the kind of small error that could seem insignificant. But this is hundreds of lives irrevocably changed, with all the ripples outward. And there’s still a lot we don’t know, as indicated by the senators’ letter full of questions.

For example, why did it take three years for Wells Fargo to report the problem after it had found the error?

“It was identified and corrected at the time, but this particular impact wasn’t something that anybody thought to look for,” Goyda told me. “Subsequently, we decided that was something we needed to do, and responded quickly once we discovered that these impacts existed.”

And why has the bank only set aside $8 million in projected costs to redress these problems, which works out to just $12,800 a borrower? And is this really the only error there is among that huge mass of mortgage modifications and foreclosures?

“Historically, miscalculations in [loan] reviews are not uncommon. They normally show up in income calculations and appraisal figures,” Alys Cohen, an attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, told me. “What’s different here—but probably not unique—was that it was an input to the software that was uniform for everybody. And the question really is: How many more of those existed both at Wells Fargo and at other companies, and what work has anyone done to identify those problems and redress the losses to homeowners?”

And finally, Wells Fargo didn’t do this off in some private corner. It was often working with government money to revamp these loans. Fannie Mae administered the program, Freddie Mac provided oversight, and various regulators could have been expected to do due diligence as well. “Where were the regulators in all of this?” Cohen asked.

One thing that’s clear from the debacle is that Wells Fargo’s in-house software—whether it was just an Excel spreadsheet or something more sophisticated—meets the three criteria of a “weapon of math destruction,” as the author Cathy O’Neil memorably termed this kind of tool. It operated with opacity at scale and generated real damage. And if there were “a Mueller probe but for all of US banking during the housing bubble and crash,” as MSNBC’s Chris Hayes recently suggested, how many other financial bombs are still lurking in the wreckage of the Great Recession?

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to [email protected].”
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/08/the-wells-fargo-counting-error-that-cost-hundreds-their-homes/567943/
 

CAbooboo

LoanSafe Member
Jan 22, 2017
66
9
8
Cabooboo, you’re not alone and really sorry to hear about your situation.

Here is a key quote from an article:

““Historically, miscalculations in [loan] reviews are not uncommon. They normally show up in income calculations and appraisal figures,” Alys Cohen, an attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, told me. “What’s different here—but probably not unique—was that it was an input to the software that was uniform for everybody. And the question really is: How many more of those existed both at Wells Fargo and at other companies, and what work has anyone done to identify those problems and redress the losses to homeowners?”

The National Consumer Law Center would be a good place to start reach out to Alys Cohen or someone else there to see what could be done.

Alternatively, contact a local attorney through the state bar referral agency.

Or of course you can contact the office of david L. speckman (an attorney I can work with if necessary with and recommend) in San Diego and ask for an appointment and phone consultation and let him know I asked you to contact him.

I can request to review your file from wells and what you have. If you need to reach me please find me on LinkedIn and reach out that way.

Here is the remainder of the article I just quoted:

“How a Wells Fargo Counting Error Cost Hundreds Their Homes

Calculating homeowners’ eligibility for mortgage modifications should have been straightforward. But an automated decision-making tool contained an error for five years.

Alexis C. Madrigal is a staff writer at The Atlantic.
Aug 21, 2018

In a short section of its most recent quarterly report, Wells Fargo revealed that for more than five years, beginning in April 2010, the company had made “an automated miscalculation” that had dropped 625 mortgage holders below a threshold where they could receive a loan modification. Four hundred of these people subsequently had their homes foreclosed on. Wells Fargo finally caught the error in October 2015.

Coverage of the problem described it as “an error,” or even “a computer glitch.” The description in the Securities and Exchange Commission filing, meanwhile, raises as many questions as it answers: “This error in the modification tool caused an automated miscalculation of attorneys’ fees that were included for purposes of determining whether a customer qualified for a mortgage loan modification.”

As a result, Senators Elizabeth Warren and Brian Schatz sent Wells Fargo executives a long list of questions demanding to know the details of the case. In sum, their queries add up to an exasperated How could this have happened?

We know this much: Wells Fargo created this software itself, according to Tom Goyda, a spokesperson for the company. “It was a tool that we developed,” he told me, “so the programming error was made internally.”

In most loan modifications, the debtor is not actually getting out of paying back any of the principal. Instead, the bank rolls the past-due principal and interest into a larger loan. The bank (or “servicer,” in industry terms) can also roll a bunch of other things like insurance premiums and fees into the new loan balance. Then, sometimes with government money as an incentive, the bank agrees to lower the interest rate and extend the term of the loan to generate a smaller monthly payment. The target amount for that payment, under the main federal program, is 31 percent of the borrower’s gross income. The new loan also has to pass another test for calculating whether the bank is likely to make roughly the same amount of money on the new loan as the old. If it does, and the debt-to-income ratio is right, perhaps the borrower can get a loan modification. If not, then it’s a no-go.

These calculations were made in tremendous numbers during the foreclosure crisis (which was precipitated, in part, by the bad loans that banks targeted to largely black and brown neighborhoods, and for which Wells Fargo was fined $175 million.) Under the most important government-backed loan-modification scheme, HAMP, or the Home Affordable Modification Program, Wells Fargo alone received 1.6 million applications from desperate people.

For these borrowers, the “automated-decisioning tool” that Wells Fargo built took all of the variables from individual loans and borrowers, and combined them with various constants—including, crucially, that incorrect calculation for attorneys’ fees—and came back with a thumbs-up, thumbs-down determination of modification eligibility. But because of that miscalculation, the automated tool gave a thumbs-down to people who were right on the borderline of getting a modification and who should have gotten a thumbs-up.

Only the decision—not its actual calculations—was rolled forward to other parts of the bank, Goyda said, so no one saw the erroneous attorney-fee number. That’s also why, as Wells Fargo disclosed, customers were not actually overcharged; the standalone tool made the decision, but the actual loan terms were dealt with by other means.

Wells Fargo approved 28 percent of modification requests, a little below the average for the four biggest servicers. The number of people affected by the attorney-fee error added up to 0.0386 percent of that HAMP pool.

Set against the massive scale of the Great Recession—9 million jobs lost, 9 million homes lost—this is the kind of small error that could seem insignificant. But this is hundreds of lives irrevocably changed, with all the ripples outward. And there’s still a lot we don’t know, as indicated by the senators’ letter full of questions.

For example, why did it take three years for Wells Fargo to report the problem after it had found the error?

“It was identified and corrected at the time, but this particular impact wasn’t something that anybody thought to look for,” Goyda told me. “Subsequently, we decided that was something we needed to do, and responded quickly once we discovered that these impacts existed.”

And why has the bank only set aside $8 million in projected costs to redress these problems, which works out to just $12,800 a borrower? And is this really the only error there is among that huge mass of mortgage modifications and foreclosures?

“Historically, miscalculations in [loan] reviews are not uncommon. They normally show up in income calculations and appraisal figures,” Alys Cohen, an attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, told me. “What’s different here—but probably not unique—was that it was an input to the software that was uniform for everybody. And the question really is: How many more of those existed both at Wells Fargo and at other companies, and what work has anyone done to identify those problems and redress the losses to homeowners?”

And finally, Wells Fargo didn’t do this off in some private corner. It was often working with government money to revamp these loans. Fannie Mae administered the program, Freddie Mac provided oversight, and various regulators could have been expected to do due diligence as well. “Where were the regulators in all of this?” Cohen asked.

One thing that’s clear from the debacle is that Wells Fargo’s in-house software—whether it was just an Excel spreadsheet or something more sophisticated—meets the three criteria of a “weapon of math destruction,” as the author Cathy O’Neil memorably termed this kind of tool. It operated with opacity at scale and generated real damage. And if there were “a Mueller probe but for all of US banking during the housing bubble and crash,” as MSNBC’s Chris Hayes recently suggested, how many other financial bombs are still lurking in the wreckage of the Great Recession?

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to [email protected].”
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/08/the-wells-fargo-counting-error-that-cost-hundreds-their-homes/567943/
Thank you very much for the suggestions. I will follow up w/ you on LinkedIn.