Well Chase Lied To Me. What Do I Do Now?

cgray77

LoanSafe Member
Jan 1, 2017
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Chase had me listed (or so they claimed) as a third borrower on the loan. They had been sending loan paperwork to me.
So then I got transferred to Seterus.

Just recieved this: "
"Our records do not indicate that charles gray is a third borrower."
"... Seterus is not a lender, consequently, we are unable to add your name to this loan as requested."

So Chase evidently lied through their teeth to me, and now Seterus has no idea who I am and won't deal with anyone save the dead executor (and the home didn't go through probate because it was a tenant in common transfer so the executor wouldn't be an issue anyway). I'm receiving information as the Successor in Interest, but that's it.

I'm so damned PO'd right now I can barely talk. Can anyone give me some advice in how to unscrew this mess?
 

Moe Bedard

Call 1-800-779-4547
Staff member
Loan Safe Mortgage
Aug 10, 2007
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I'm sorry to hear that. If I were you, I would get a lawyer. This appears to me like you are being purposely railroaded so the can screw you and take the home.
 

cgray77

LoanSafe Member
Jan 1, 2017
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I wish I could, but sadly, I can't afford a lawyer, so if this goes to court I'm likely to be doing it myself, and I'd prefer to avoid that because we all know about the problems with that.

I've got pnumonia right now, so I won't call them today, but when I do I'm both calling and sending in a letter, if I don't hear back within 20 days, I've been advised to report chase to both the state and federal regulatory agencies.

Good news? The property was moms, and I'm her son, so they don't have a choice-- can't pull any BS about how I'm not financially secure enough.
 

Moe Bedard

Call 1-800-779-4547
Staff member
Loan Safe Mortgage
Aug 10, 2007
26,835
466
1,000
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Southern California
www.loansafe.org
That is what I would do as well. Federal law allows for the transfer of the loan to a relative when a parent dies. Most mortgages contain a due-on-sale or acceleration clause that allows a lender to demand immediate and full payment, but transfers due to death are exempt. This means you should be able to assume the loan with the same interest rate and payment you have.

"It's just as though it were handed to you by a deed," though you may have to follow legal formalities, such as filing a will or letters of administration in probate court, says Ebby, who is also an adjunct professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.