How to Handle Unwelcome Callers

estela13

LoanSafe Member
Oct 17, 2010
450
2
18
Inland Empire CA
Good for you Tom.. Lately i have been receiving tons of calls my SOL was up last October, I will keep ignoring them.
Funny thing is they never leave a message.
~Estela
 
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chabsin

LoanSafe Member
Oct 7, 2010
72
0
6
Not sure how this fits in to the "unresponsiveness" strategy, but California's a simple letter to the bank, asking them to stop calling you about this loan, would require them to stop. (The Federal restrictions only apply to debt collectors; California's Rosenthal act expands this to original creditors as well).

I've tried it with Bank of America and they even sent a written letter to confirm the phone calls will stop.
 

TomEason

LoanSafe Guide
Jun 18, 2009
12,390
84
48
SF Bay Area CA
chabsin

Thanks for your post.

While what you say is certainly true in our state, sending a letter is hardly being unresponsive. The act of mailing a letter to the creditor informs that creditor they have the correct address.

IMHO, that's not a desirable move.
 

chabsin

LoanSafe Member
Oct 7, 2010
72
0
6
chabsin

Thanks for your post.

While what you say is certainly true in our state, sending a letter is hardly being unresponsive. The act of mailing a letter to the creditor informs that creditor they have the correct address.

IMHO, that's not a desirable move.
Tom,

Point taken, and you're likely correct. However, reading these boards leads me to the conclusion that most people aren't as good as you :) ... they end up slipping-up, and will occasionally answer the phone or even - Heaven forbid! - enter into discussions with the callers. With that in mind, I think sending such a letter is the lesser of two evils -- especially if done so early on in the process, as one is getting ready or just beginning to apply "the strategy".

It is now six months or more since I've sent that letter and had since had zero contact with the bank, something that I was (unfortunately) otherwise unable to achieve.

(Maybe I'm fooling myself ... and I really just wanted the phone-ringing to stop!)
 

silverwesoke

LoanSafe Member
Jan 5, 2011
48
0
0
CHABSIN..forgive me for writing to you on this forum as I dont think it is the correct one, but the forum I found you on was closed for new posts.

I read you were trying to settle a second with BOA but I cant find any follow ups to this and wondering if you ever were able to settle or did they ever threaten you with FC. I am about to embark on the same road with BOA and would appreciate hearing how you are doing with this. I hope it is working out. Thanks much
 

American_Nightmare_in_GA

LoanSafe Member
Sep 2, 2012
132
0
0
Hi, I'm still on the early end of this and the bank doesn't know yet what is coming. I just signed up for the Google Voice number. Then logged into my mortgage account on my lender's website and changed my phone number to the Google number in my profile there.

It seems that you call my new Google phone number, an operator's voice says, "Hello, please leave a message at the tone, and Google Voice will try to connect you". Next, it rings a couple of times and then rings direrectly through to my cell phone number. I wonder if there is a "generic Google greeting" that does not say the word Google at all, and just goes straight to voicemail? If it says Google, of course the bank will call once and never call again. They'll just go into their files and pull out what is on record - the real phone number(s). If it says nothing, they might be duped into thinking you did change your number, especially if you don't ever answer them on the other lines. (That's what I hope.)

1. Is there a way to change the greeting that Google uses when someone places a call directly to the new Google number? If not, then I don't see the point. The minute they call this number, they are tipped off as to what I have just set up.


2. It seems that I have Google Voice set to roll straight through to my cell number (which is what I don't want), right after it tells the caller that it is Google Voice. I'm going back in now to see if there's a way I can set it to go straight to voicemail....without tipping off the caller as to what they are calling.

Any technical set-up tips are appreciated, thanks! :)
 

TomEason

LoanSafe Guide
Jun 18, 2009
12,390
84
48
SF Bay Area CA
Hi, I'm still on the early end of this and the bank doesn't know yet what is coming. I just signed up for the Google Voice number. Then logged into my mortgage account on my lender's website and changed my phone number to the Google number in my profile there.

It seems that you call my new Google phone number, an operator's voice says, "Hello, please leave a message at the tone, and Google Voice will try to connect you". Next, it rings a couple of times and then rings direrectly through to my cell phone number. I wonder if there is a "generic Google greeting" that does not say the word Google at all, and just goes straight to voicemail? If it says Google, of course the bank will call once and never call again. They'll just go into their files and pull out what is on record - the real phone number(s). If it says nothing, they might be duped into thinking you did change your number, especially if you don't ever answer them on the other lines. (That's what I hope.)

1. Is there a way to change the greeting that Google uses when someone places a call directly to the new Google number? If not, then I don't see the point. The minute they call this number, they are tipped off as to what I have just set up.


2. It seems that I have Google Voice set to roll straight through to my cell number (which is what I don't want), right after it tells the caller that it is Google Voice. I'm going back in now to see if there's a way I can set it to go straight to voicemail....without tipping off the caller as to what they are calling.

Any technical set-up tips are appreciated, thanks! :)
Thanks for your question.

FYI, there are many options and tweaks that can be made to one's Google Voice setup. I've never yet seen any complaints about their service (but what do I know, lol?)

You might access Google Voice to view all the options, or consult Google Voice Help.
 

American_Nightmare_in_GA

LoanSafe Member
Sep 2, 2012
132
0
0
Thank you Tom! I found it. The main thing I needed to do was record my own generic personal greeting as if I was a generic operator (in order to not tip anyone off that this was Google Voice). I also needed to enable "do not disturb" which makes it go straight to Google Voicemail, so I can monitor the calls from there.

My generic answer is: "The subscriber you are trying to reach is not available. Please leave a message at the tone. This call may be recorded." (and I did activate the selection of recording all of the voicemails, too)

Hopefully I've got it set up correctly with all of the useful options, but if anybody has any others that I might have missed that you have found to be really useful, please let me know. :)
 

floater

LoanSafe Member
Aug 24, 2012
10
0
0
I am starting to receive "the calls" I ignore but this morning they blasted my cell phone 3 consecutive times.. I have gone onto my servicer sight and blocked the numbers. Has anyone else done this? Would it be a problem in doing so?
 

TomEason

LoanSafe Guide
Jun 18, 2009
12,390
84
48
SF Bay Area CA
floater

Thanks for your post.

Since I don't know whose calls you've blocked, I can't offer any credible advice. If it's a CA calling about a delinquent consumer credit item, like a CC, then I see no downside.

However if the calls are from your mortgage lender, they may think the property is unoccupied/abandoned. In that case, I'd recommend you send the lender a letter stating that henceforth, all communications to you are to be in writing.
 

floater

LoanSafe Member
Aug 24, 2012
10
0
0
Thanks for your reply Tom.. I really need to work on 'clarity' posts! Nationstar the mortgage servicer is calling. I don't have a landline so they call either my work phone or my cell. While I can't block them from my work phone I can with my cellular provider. They can still reach me via my work phone or email, which they have and still are. I just figured by blocking them from my cell is just eliminating one source of their aggravating calls.

I can alway unblock them with my cell provider. Maybe I'll give it a few days and then unblock and see what happens. I have just missed my first 'official' month of payment so I'm guessing this is the influx in calls ....
 

bubberrand

LoanSafe Member
Aug 21, 2010
146
4
18
Well, they have given up calling, but I know they haven't given up the pursuit of their money. I seriously doubt I'll get out of this unscathed. Its just a matter of how long they are willing to wait.
 

Sweetlaureng

LoanSafe Member
Jan 24, 2013
15
0
0
Do you want to keep your house? I hope things work out they way they say on this site. I feel like I am tking a risk for the first time. I always strived to do the right thing, that's why this is so hard for me!

Well, they have given up calling, but I know they haven't given up the pursuit of their money. I seriously doubt I'll get out of this unscathed. Its just a matter of how long they are willing to wait.
 

Sweetlaureng

LoanSafe Member
Jan 24, 2013
15
0
0
Hi Tom,
We have been following your advice on "settling on your 2nd loan" for 27 days now. Very hard for me, easy for my husband. I got a call at work from some sort of "code" number I never saw today for the first time from "her." This was my only safe place and I am not sure how she got this number. I am a teacher so it makes it kinda annoying. Now what. She said why didn't I pay, she needs a payment now, I told her no I don't have the money, she said when will you have it, I said never. Long and short of it is she caught me off guard. I told her I couldn't talk I am with a student now. What should I do. I have a feeling she will be calling tomorrow and ect. Any advice? Thanks!

Unresponsiveness is truly the champion of defensive postures!

Indifference and unresponsiveness are cousins that go hand-in-hand.

Unresponsiveness may be the ultimate attitude and weapon for debtors.

Nonresponse throws lenders and collection agents completely off their game. They don’t know how to handle non-response, apathy, and indifference. This posture truly drives collections departments bananas.

Through the use of available telecommunications technology that enables us to block unwanted calls and/or to never hear the phone ring, unresponsiveness is easy to practice.

If the collections agent can never speak with the debtor, his/her most effective tool is eliminated. No matter how well scripted and how well trained, that collector is never able to use those skills.

When collections departments and outfits eventually realize the futility of their efforts, they decide to stop calling. Whereas, when the debtor speaks with a collections agent, the relentless collection calls will continue. Why? Because by responding the debtor is injecting energy into the process, thereby ensuring continued collection activity.

That’s a testament to the effectiveness of unresponsiveness.

It’s not only possible, but it’s now easy to avoid unwanted calls for many years, to include outlasting the applicable statute of limitations.
 

Ready2Run

LoanSafe Member
Aug 11, 2010
611
18
18
San Francisco Bay Area, CA
Tell her you are unable to receive personal calls at work and request that she NEVER call this number again. If they are told this they must stop calling per the FDCPA.

Worth reading the act and looking up to see if there are any state specific acts in your state. California takes it one step further which is good for us living here.
 

TomEason

LoanSafe Guide
Jun 18, 2009
12,390
84
48
SF Bay Area CA
Hi Sweetlaureng

Hi Tom,We have been following your advice on "settling on your 2nd loan" for 27 days now. Very hard for me, easy for my husband. I got a call at work from some sort of "code" number I never saw today for the first time from "her." This was my only safe place and I am not sure how she got this number. I am a teacher so it makes it kinda annoying. Now what. She said why didn't I pay, she needs a payment now, I told her no I don't have the money, she said when will you have it, I said never. Long and short of it is she caught me off guard. I told her I couldn't talk I am with a student now. What should I do. I have a feeling she will be calling tomorrow and ect. Any advice? Thanks!
Thanks for your post. If collections again calls your school and you pick up the phone, I recommend you promptly terminate the call. To follow up on Ready2Run's advice, send a cease and desist letter to the lender. If you ever mistakenly pick up the phone at home, again I recommend you terminate the call. Whatever you do, do not engage in any conversation and definitely answer no questions.
 

Sweetlaureng

LoanSafe Member
Jan 24, 2013
15
0
0
Thanks Tom. My husband said why didn't you hang up. She just caught me so off guard. I get calls all the time with districts asking for me by name re: students. The other issue is that I share the phone line, so I don't want to get others involved in my issues. Ahh..I will read the Ready2Run's advice and the letter you recomended. I just can't believe GT is going so hard so soon!


Thanks for your post. If collections again calls your school and you pick up the phone, I recommend you promptly terminate the call. To follow up on Ready2Run's advice, send a cease and desist letter to the lender. If you ever mistakenly pick up the phone at home, again I recommend you terminate the call. Whatever you do, do not engage in any conversation and definitely answer no questions.